Dharmacakra, or, The wheel of the law
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Dharmacakra, or, The wheel of the law

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Published by Fine Arts Dept. in Bangkok, Thailand .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references.

Other titlesDharmacakra., Wheel of the law.
Statementby Dhanit Yupho.
SeriesThai culture ;, new ser., no. 25
ContributionsThailand. Krom Sinlapākō̜n.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsMLCS 92/15471 (N)
The Physical Object
Pagination28 p. :
Number of Pages28
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1382110M
LC Control Number92929828

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Dharmacakra or the wheel of the law. Bangkok, Thailand: Promotion and Public Relations Sub-division, Fine Arts Dept., (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Dhanit Yupho. Etymology. Sanskrit: "Wheel of the Law." The Sanskrit noun dharma is a derivation from the root dhṛ, which has a meaning of "to hold, maintain, keep", and takes a meaning of "what is established or firm" and hence "law". It is derived from the Vedic Sanskrit n-stem dharman-with the meaning "bearer, supporter" in the historical Vedic religion conceived of as an aspect of Ṛta. The Dharmacakra is a symbol that has represented dharma, the Buddhas teaching of the path to enlightenment, since the early period of Indian Buddhism. It is also sometimes translated as wheel of doctrine or wheel of law. A similar symbol is also in use in Jainism. It . Sanskrit: “Wheel of the Law.”. The Sanskrit noun dharma is a derivation from the root dhṛ, which has a meaning of “to hold, maintain, keep”, and takes a meaning of “what is established or firm” and hence “law”. It is derived from the Vedic Sanskrit n -stem dharman- with the meaning “bearer, supporter” in the historical Vedic religion conceived of as an aspect of Ṛta.

  The Dharma Wheel is an Ashtamangala, or one of ‘Eight Auspicious Symbols’, a set of sacred symbols found in Indian religions. Although the Dharma Wheel is found also in Hinduism and Jainism, it is best-known as a Buddhist symbol. Known also as a Dharmachakra, the Dharma Wheel in Buddhism is an important symbol that represents the teachings of Buddha.   The dharma wheel, or dharmachakra in Sanskrit, is one of the oldest symbols of Buddhism. Around the globe, it is used to represent Buddhism in the same way that a cross represents Christianity or a Star of David represents Judaism. It is also .   Dharma means “law” and Chakra means “wheel”. Dharma Chakra mudra means “the wheel of law”. It represents a circle, a symbol for continuity. This mudra reflects the continuous flow of energy in the body. It is also called the “Kalachakra”, which means “The Cycles of Time”. Dharma Chakra mudra represents the union of inner world with the outer world.   The Wheel of Law (Sanskrit: Dharmacakra), sometimes representing Sakyamuni Buddha and the Dharma teaching; also representing the mandala and chakra.

The Wheel of the Law (dharmachakra) is the single most important symbol of Buddhism, denoting the Buddha’s First Sermon in the forest at Sarnath, where he set Buddhist Law (dharma) in motion. The wheel elevated on a pillar (dharmachakrastambha) is unique to the Mon territories of Thailand, and inscriptions from the Pali canon explicitly link. The Dharmacakra symbol refers to an eight-spoked wheel that is a universal symbol of Buddhism. Also called the Wheel of Dharma, it represents the Dharma or law taught by the Buddha as the path to the achievement of nirvana or enlightenment.   The wheel (Skt. chakra; Tib. 'khor lo) or dharma wheel (Skt. dharmachakra) is one of the most important Buddhist symbols, as it represents the teachings of the Buddha. Turning the Wheel of Dharma. The Buddha was the one who "turned the wheel of the dharma" and thus the wheel symbol is the Dharmachakra, or "wheel of law.". Eight Spoked Wheel/Dharmachakra/Dharma Wheel It is also called the ‘Wheel of Truth/Law’ (dharma = truth/law, chakra = wheel). It refers to a story after Buddha achieved enlightenment, Lord Brahma (who is like our God) came down from heaven and requested the Buddha to teach by offering him a Dharmachakra.